Brugmann sells building and newspaper

Bruce Brugmann has agreed to sell the Bay Guardian, the longtime progressive weekly, to the new owners of the Examiner for an undisclosed price, according to a report by the Chron’s Andrew S. Ross. The transaction will close next month. Brugmann The deal, which had been rumored for weeks, was announced after Brugmann sold the Guardian’s 27,000-square-foot building at 135 Mississippi St. for $6.5 million, according to a report by J.K. Dineen of the San Francisco Business Times. The sale

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Examiner to buy the Guardian? Not yet

There are conflicting reports tonight (April 19) on whether the new owners of the Examiner have bought, or are in the process of buying, the Bay Guardian alternative weekly owned by Bruce Brugmann and his wife Jean. Rachel Swan of the East Bay Express reported this afternoon that the sale had been finalized, attributing the information to two sources. Later, the Express quoted Guardian Executive Editor Tim Redmond as saying that the deal wasn’t final but that he was “very

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Guardian, SF Weekly settle, terms not disclosed

The Bay Guardian and SF Weekly announced on their respective websites Monday that they have reached a settlement after the Guardian won a $21 million judgment over allegations that the Weekly sold ads at below cost in violation of state law. While both publications wrote tens of thousands of words about the case as it moved through the courts, the announcements were short. Neither side disclosed the terms. The Guardian said: “The parties have settled their differences on mutually acceptable

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Columbia J-school to honor Brugmann

Brugmann Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism announced Monday it will present one of its 2011 Alumni Awards to Bruce Brugmann, owner of the Bay Guardian. “Since Bruce Brugmann and his wife, Jean Dibble, founded the San Francisco Bay Guardian more than 40 years ago, the feisty weekly with a slogan of ‘raising hell and printing the news’ has never let up on championing the public interest and challenging the existing power structure in government, business, and the media itself,”

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Two opinions on the Chron’s plight

Here’s a stunner of a headline, at least for Bruce Brugmann’s Bay Guardian: “Save the Chronicle!” He’s been criticizing the Chronicle for 42 years for failing to cover stories and for its biased slant on others. But if the Chronicle dies, the city will lose an important, if often infuriating, civic institution. Hearst should not be allowed to turn San Francisco into the first major American city with no major daily newspaper — not without extensive oversight, hearings, and a

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SF Weekly owner doesn’t want to pay up

The corporate owner of the SF Weekly is vowing to make it hard for the Bay Guardian to collect the $15.6 million it was awarded by a San Francisco jury on Thursday. The jury found that the Weekly, owned by the 16-paper Village Voice Media chain, sold ads at below cost for 12 years in an attempt to run the locally owned Guardian out of business, in violation of California’s predatory pricing law. In a post trial commentary on its

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Secrets will be revealed at antitrust trial

Lawyers for MediaNews and Hearst have gone to unusual lengths to keep secret information they have filed in response to Clint Reilly’s lawsuit alleging antitrust violations. But U.S. District Judge Susan Illston (left) said in an order issued yesterday (April 12) that documents they use during the trial will be made public. Documents already under seal will remain confidential unless they are used at trial, she said. Bay Guardian publisher Bruce Brugmann (right), whose paper along with the nonprofit Media

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Trial of SF Weekly owner delayed

A judge has delayed until October a trial involving San Francisco’s two alternative weekly newspapers. The Bay Guardian, owned by Bruce Brugmann, is suing Village Voice Media, owner the SF Weekly and East Bay Express. Brugmann claims the chain violated state law by using profits generated at its 16 other papers to subsidize illegally cheap ads in San Francisco in order to run his paper out of business. The trial had been set for July 16, but San Francisco Superior

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